FAQ

So what do I get for my Membership  Fee?

Why should I support the program when my industry has not been affected?

What are the eligibility requirements to carry the trademarked WEA symbol?

How were eligibility requirements determined?

How is WEA different from “Made in the U.S.A.”?

How will compliance within the program be monitored?

What action will be taken if a manufacturer falls out of compliance

Are there guidelines for the use of WEA art?

Can my company publicize its own participation outside of the planned WEA campaign?

Is it a one-time fee to become a WEA participant?

 

So what do I get for my Membership  Fee?

By educating the consumer to look for products that bear the  trademarked WEA symbol – something never before nationally  branded –  participating WEA Member Companies will increase  their exposure as a firm who employs American workers, and be  acknowledged by increasing their sales.

Why should I support the program when my industry has not been affected?

Are you certain that your industry has not been affected? If so, are you sure that it won’t be in the future?

At this point, manufacturing in the United States has been the hardest hit, but overseas outsourcing has touched many industries and continues to spread as a  short-term, cost-saving solution.

“A new round of globalization is sending upscale jobs offshore. They include chip design, engineering, basic research – even financial analysis” (Business Week, Feb. 3, 2003).

Workers abroad have reached the skill level of American workers in most industries, but are paid far less with little or no benefits.  This is especially true in the information technology industry.

“Architectural work ranging from home design to multibillion-dollar petrochemical plants is outsourced to Hungary, India and the Philippines. Filipinos prepare tax returns and crunch numbers for audits conducted by U.S. accounting firms” (“Lethal Outsourcing,” The Washington Times, Feb. 27, 2003).

Even if you feel secure in your position, you may know someone who has lost a job in recent years. It may have been attributable to overseas outsourcing whether you realized it or not. As this outsourcing trend continues, more people close to you will be affected – perhaps even you.

If not for yourself or your neighbor, support this program to help slow the spread of outsourcing among more and more industries and the gradual degradation of the American economy.

What are the eligibility requirements to carry the trademarked WEA symbol?

Membership is available to a company with one or more products that meet WEA criteria. To bear the We Employ America symbol, a product must have at least 65% of the total cost of the components, manufacture and packaging incurred within the United States.

A member company may apply the WEA symbol on qualifying products, unless all of that company’s products meet the 65% standard. In that case, the WEA symbol can be used in association with the brand itself.

How were eligibility requirements determined?

The WEA eligibility requirement reflects the realities of the global marketplace. The 65% standard is a realistic percentage given the fact that few products are manufactured without at least some materials crossing an international border.

The current state of manufacturing and general trend toward foreign outsourcing in most industries requires an immediate response.

How is WEA different from “Made in the U.S.A.”?

The “Made in the U.S.A.” symbol has been a great asset to many American companies and to consumers like you who may seek out American-made products. It is not the intent of WEA to replace “Made in the U.S.A.” on packaging, but rather to be a multi-faceted, cooperative program unified by a unique symbol. WEA aims to provide an informative and motivating, national campaign to drive the program, accompanied by the universal WEA symbol.

Unfortunately, the  “U.S.A.” concept has been diluted as more and more products feature American flags or other vague symbols on their packaging. Without any accompanying language, they mean very little. Anyone can legally utilize an American flag or other patriotic symbols on packaging or advertising; however, the similarity to the “Made in U.S.A.” statement can easily mislead the buying public.

The WEA symbol was designed to ensure that it would not be confused with any other patriotic representation. It contains multiple elements that all must exist to truly represent a WEA-approved product.

How will compliance within the program be monitored?

WEA requires that each membership applicant provide a signed statement attesting that the company meets or exceeds WEA eligibility requirements. WEA membership contracts specify that, in signing, the company representative is also certifying that the company meets or exceeds the outlined criteria.

What action will be taken if a manufacturer falls out of compliance?

If a manufacturer fails to meet the eligibility requirements of the WEA program for domestic labor and materials content, its membership is considered null and void. Renewal of membership will not be an option and the company will be disallowed from any further association with the WEA program.

Are there guidelines for the use of WEA art?

Yes. Participants of the program will be given access to download art from the website.

Can my company publicize its own participation outside of the planned WEA campaign?

Yes! In fact, when your company is accepted as a WEA Member, you will have access to prepared press releases and other distributable information announcing your entry into the program, including linking to our website.

Use of the WEA symbol is limited to packaging on eligible products as previously outlined.

Is it a one-time fee to become a WEA participant?

The base membership fee is good for one year of membership from the date of signing, and must be renewed annually at 50% of the initial fee. Licensing of WEA artwork and access to all other membership benefits and materials are also for the duration of a year.